Pupil Premium



Pupil Premium Funding

The Pupil Premium is an allocation of additional funding provided to schools to support specific groups of children who are vulnerable to possible underachievement.  These include pupils who are entitled to free school meals, those looked after by the local authority and children of armed service personnel.  The intended effect of this funding is to accelerate progress and raise attainment.

It is up to schools to decide how the allocation is spent based on the needs of the children.  All schools are required to report on the amount of funding received, how this is being used and the impact of any work done.

Click here to read our policy on pupil premium funding.

The Pupil Premium 2011-12

In 2011/12 Kings Furlong Juniors received £21, 472 in Pupil Premium funding. This was used as follows:

•providing an additional member of staff for Year 6 booster groups •1-1 reading •additional mental maths, spelling, phonics, handwriting and catch up maths groups •pastoral support interventions through ELSA and Draw and Talk •one to one tutoring

We also employ Kathy Gare, parent support advisor, to improve attendance and wellbeing at school and to support vulnerable children.

The impact of this work is evident in:

There was a greater number of pupils entitled to Pupil Premium Funding achieving expected progress in reading and writing in 2012 compared to 2011. English: 58% in 2011, 78% in 2012.

There was a greater number of pupils entitled to Pupil Premium Funding attaining Level 4 or above in BOTH maths and English in 2012 compared to 2011. English: 50% in 2011, 78% in 2012 Maths: 64% in 2011, 78% in 2012.

The Pupil Premium 2012-13

In 2012-13, Kings Furlong Juniors received nearly £43,000 in Pupil Premium funding.  This was based on the number of children who are entitled to Free School Meals, and also children from service families or those who are in care.  The funding is used to benefit children who are vulnerable, including those who do not fall into the FSM, service family or in care categories.  However, the impact of the funding on the children in these groups is rigorously monitored and outlined below.

Between September 2012 and April 2013, the money was allocated to:

  • provide additional, experienced teachers to run English and maths booster groups in Years 3, 5 and 6
  • fund tuition in Year 6 to support English and maths
  • fund extra LSA support in Y6
  • fund our parent support advisor
  • provide a weekly homework club
  • fund a member of staff to run ‘Young Interpreters’ and provide EAL support

 What has been the impact of the funding on our Free School Meal (FSM) pupils?

APS comparison of FSM and Non-FSM Groups

APS comparison of FSM and Non-FSM Groups July 2013

Numbers in brackets = no in group

Reading

Writing

Maths

Attainment

KS progress

Attainment

KS

progress

Attainment

KS

progress

KS1

Aut

Spring

Sum

KS1

Aut

Spring

Sum

KS1

Aut

Spring

Sum

Y3

FSM (16)

13.9

13

15.3

16.7

2.8

13.5

11.5

13.4

15.5

2

14.7

13.3

14.5

16.3

1.6

Non-FSM (49)

16.1

15.2

16.6

19

2.9

15.6

13.6

15.6

17

1.4

16.2

15.5

16.6

18.5

2.3

Gap

2.2

2.2

1.3

2.3

0.1N

2.1

2.1

2.6

1.5

0.6FSM

1.5

2.3

2.1

2.2

0.7N

Y4

FSM (23)

15.2

17.8

20.6

21.9

6.7

14.5

15.3

17.2

18.6

4.1

15.2

16.3

18.2

19.8

4.6

Non-FSM (39)

16.3

18.5

20.6

21.9

6

15.7

16.1

17.7

19.5

3.8

15.9

18.7

20.3

22

6.1

Gap

1.1

0.7

0

0

0.7 FSM

1.2

0.8

0.5

0.9

0.3 FSM

0.7

2.4

2.1

2.2

1.5 N

Y5

FSM (11)

16.5

21.9

22.6

22.8

6.3

15.2

19

21.4

22.9

7.7

16.1

21.4

21.7

24.7

8.6

Non-FSM (44)

15.8

21

23

21.5

5.7

14.7

18.5

20.7

22.3

7.6

15.7

20.2

20.8

23.7

8

Gap

0.7+

0.9+

0.4

1.3+

0.6 FSM

0.5+

0.5+

0.7+

0.6+

0.1 N

0.4+

1.2+

0.9+

1+

0.6 FSM

Y6

FSM

14.1

23.4

24.9

29

14.9

13.6

18.5

21.5

25

11.4

15

21.8

24.6

28

13

Non-FSM

16

27.5

28.9

29.8

13.8

15.2

22.5

25.1

27.5

12.3

16.1

24.8

27.1

29.4

13.3

Gap

1.9

4.1

4

0.8

1.1 FSM

1.6

4

3.6

2.5

0.9

1.1

3

2.5

1.4

0.3

Green shows either a gap closing or an advantage to the FSM group, which is summarised here:

  • Y3 gap in attainment for writing is closing and progress for FSM children is better than non-FSM children
  • Y4 no gap in attainment for reading and progress for FSM children in reading and writing is better than non-FSM children.
  • Y5 attainment is higher and progress is better in reading and maths for FSM children.  FSM children have higher attainment in writing.
  • Y6 attainment gap in reading, writing and maths closed across the year.  Progress for FSM readers was better.

Booster Groups

Pupil Premium funds paid for a highly experienced teacher to run a year 6 booster group for 4 mornings every week from September to May.  These were English and Maths sessions and supported children who required focussed teaching to make accelerated progress.

Y6 Booster

Number of children supported

% 2 levels progress

% L4

APS

Number of FSM

% 2 levels progress

%L4

APS

Writing11915522.76843321.4
Maths11739125.84507525.5

 This was a very successful booster group.  Pupil Premium money has had a significant impact on the children in these groups.  A year 6 booster group will operate again in September. 

The Year 5 booster group ran for one term due to staff turbulence.  However, Mrs Chapman, the Y6 booster teacher, has worked with the children in Y5 since SATs finished and will continue with these children in September 2013.

Y5 Booster

Number of children supported

APS over year

Average number of sublevels since Autumn

Number of FSM

APS over year

Average number of sublevels since Autumn

Writing

10

20

1.7

4

19

2

Maths

11

20.1

1.3

2

19

1

 The Year 3 booster group began in January and operated on Thursdays and Fridays.  The booster group teacher reported increased levels of confidence in the children, over time, and a greater willingness to share their ideas. Progress made in writing has been evident in the children’s books. From September 2013, this booster group will operate five days a week, and it is anticipated that this will result in improved rates of progress. 

Y3 Booster

Number of children supported

APS of group

Average number of sublevels since Autumn

Number of FSM

APS

Average number of sublevels since Autumn

Writing

10

14.2

1.7

4

14.5

1.75

Maths

4

14.5

1.5

2

14

1.5

 2:1 Tuition for Year 6

Pupil Premium funded extra teaching hours to provide support for some children who required a short intervention to boost their attainment.

2:1 tuitionNumber of children supportedAPS% 2+ levels progress% L4+Number of FSM% 2 levels progress% L4
Reading327.766660  
Writing322.41003321000
Maths627.51001005100100

Additional LSA support for Y6

To support the needs of the most vulnerable learners in Y6, an LSA was employed to support the learning and acquisition of basic skills in order for the children to make accelerated progress to achieve age related outcomes. 

When asked, the children who benefitted from this support said:

“Mrs V would work with us one at a time or in a small group to work on specific things we were stuck on.  She really made a difference to our learning and she would be determined and encourage us.’

Parent Support Advisor

Our parent support advisor, Kathy, works within our cluster to help families deal with issues such as attendance, punctuality, behaviour or other issues which make children vulnerable.  Kathy’s work improves liaison between school and parents to work through some tricky situations.  This has involved helping families access other agencies, fetching children to and collecting them from school and running Triple P parenting sessions amongst many other things.  Kathy also helps in school when we invite our parents in to shared sessions which has improved the engagement parents have with school and their children’s learning.

A parent who Kathy has supported said: “Kathy is an amazing support.  She gets straight back to me with solutions to problems.  Words can’t describe how she has helped.  She supports the whole family and if I could buy her a bunch of flowers every week, I would.”

Homework Club

Homework Club is available for all children but Pupil Premium has been used as a way of supporting our more vulnerable learners.  Completing homework can be an issue for many reasons, such as not having the necessary resources, parents feeling they are unable to help or it was causing arguments.  Children coming to school with incomplete homework feel disengaged with the learning process at school. 

Our homework club is run by 2 members of our staff after school so they can support the children in their learning and also ensure the correct resources are available from laptops, colouring pencils, glue etc. 

The children who attend the club are very positive about it, telling our Pupil Premium governor that they would not complete their homework if they did not attend.  They cited reasons such as: their house is too noisy, they could not research because they did not have a computer or siblings made it difficult. 

A parent said that their child would struggle to complete the work at home but is now proud to finish it every week before the weekend.  Another parent said that when they found it difficult to help, their child became frustrated but that the friendly and helpful teachers at the club can guide the learning. 

Teachers report improved rates of completion of homework for the children who attend which supports their learning in class significantly.  It also reduces the levels of disengagement that failure to complete homework can cause.

Young Interpreters and EAL

A member of staff has the responsibility to work with children who have issues because English is an additional language, for example by leading intervention groups for improving confidence and conversation.  Pupil Premium provides extra time for this member of staff to support EAL children through:

  • running ‘Young Interpreters’ where children are trained to support others who are new arrivals and have yet to develop the English language.
  • running a language club where children have the opportunity to learn about other languages and cultures based on the range of languages within our school.
  • liaising with EMTAS to ensure appropriate resources are in school to support children with their particular language needs. 

When asked, our Young Interpreters said:

“It is good.  It was fun at the conference.  It has helped me learn about different languages and it has helped my English.”

“We discuss how to support younger children and it helps children who don’t speak good English.  It has helped my English.”

“We go on trips and meet other people from our countries and other countries.  It is positive and we share things.  If didn’t have Young Interpreters there wouldn’t be anyone to help children if their English isn’t strong.”

Children of Service Families

The 2 children we have who fall into this category are making satisfactory or above satisfactory progress and their attainment is in line or above age related expectations.  Neither of the children have required any interventions or additional support but they have benefitted from the reduced class sizes that booster groups have brought about.

The Pupil Premium 2013-14

A needs analysis for every child with an FSM entitlement was carried out to inform our PP spending decisions.  Based on this and having regard to the principles outlined in our Pupil Premium policy, the funding of £57,000 was deployed towards the cost of the following. A further £56 for each child was received in January 2014 totalling £3000.

How was the money spent?

Use

Purpose

Impact

Experienced teachers to run focus groups for English and mathsTo improve staff:pupil ratio to approximately 1:12 so children, who are working below the expected level for their age, learn with a smaller group of pupils of similar needs.  This also reduces class size in all classes to approximately 24.The gap in achievement between PP children and non-PP children in focus groups and in class is closing in all areas (reading, writing and maths) in most year groups.The percentage of PP children who made 2 sublevels progress in reading and maths is higher than their non PP peers and is only 3% lower for writing.
TuitionTo support PP children to improve and develop writing skills with a staff:PP pupil ratio of 1:2.The gap between our PP writers and non-PP writers is closing in 2 year groups and in one year group PP progress exceeds the progress of the non-PP.
Young CarersTo provide our young carers with the opportunity to come together to join in activities at school and also with a council run group.66% of this group are PP children.The progress of the PP young carers is outstanding in reading, writing and maths.  When asked, the children who attend the council run group which is supported by KFJ, said that the group gives them a break from helping, they meet new friends who are in similar circumstances and they can also talk about school.
Young interpretersTo coach Young Interpreters to provide support for children with English as an additional language to develop their fluency and understanding.The progress of EAL children in reading, writing and maths is outstanding with the progress of PP EAL children exceeding that of the non PP EAL children.
Educational supplies and activitiesTo assist with contributions to outings, visits and school journeys as well as equipment for use in school and elsewhere.Greater access to opportunities has improved achievement and wellbeing.  When asked, the children explain how the visits developed their vocabulary and understanding of concepts and that the personal experience was more effective then reading and research alone.
Reading Eggs online reading programTo improve the access of a range of reading texts and genre.The progress of our PP readers is outstanding.  The gap between our PP readers and non PP readers is closing in all year groups apart from Year 6 where the attainment and progress of PP readers exceeds the achievement of their non PP peers.
Service of educational psychologistTo provide assessment, support and advice for SEN children with a range of needs.To develop support staff to carry out precision teaching during 1-1 interventions.The progress of PP children who have SEN is good in reading and writing and outstanding in maths.  The progress of this group is greater than non PP children with SEN.
Family support workerTo support children and families with issues of attendance, punctuality and behaviour.The gap between PP and non PP attendance has begun to close – last year’s gap was 2.5% and is now 2.1%.
Attendance prizesTo encourage better attendance and punctuality.
Sports fundingImprove wellbeing of children through greater participation in clubs.80% of our PP children attended clubs compared to last year’s 63%.  When asked, the children reported that the clubs helped them to learn particular skills eg. ICT, rounders etc.  Also, homework club helped children to be clear about questions and check understanding that their parents would not be able to help with at home.

The Pupil Premium 2014-15

In April 2014 the amount of Pupil Premium awarded to Kings Furlong Juniors was £78,300 for 2014-15 based on £1300 per eligible child.  Again, the money is to be deployed to ensure raised attainment and increased rates of progress of children who are vulnerable due to disadvantaged backgrounds.  The spending plan is as follows:

Pupil Premium 2014-15

Use

Purpose

Intended outcome

Evidence

Learning coaches (assistant head teachers to perform this role)To support PP children to accelerate their progress in order to raise attainment so it is in line with their non-PP peers.Improved acquisition of skills through:developing the ability to learn:

improving resilience and independence

liaising with parents

developing language and vocabulary

improving self-esteem and ability to take risks

Parents, children and teachers report improved levels of attainment and attitude post-coachingAchievement data
Focus group teachersTo teach smaller groups of children with the greatest gap in attainment and to reduce class size.Raised achievement of PP children through increased levels of attainment and progress so they are in line with their non-PP peers.Children who are behind age-related expectations will accelerate their progress in order to catch up.Achievement data
Family support workerTo support identified families who have issues around punctuality, attendance and behaviour.All PP children attend school and are punctual unless there is a genuine illness.Attendance and punctuality data
Educational supplies and activitiesTo provide resources and funding for visits, visitors, school journeys etc.All children will have equal access to the curriculum in order to achieve.Data and anecdotal evidence

The impact of the premium on achievement will be monitored throughout the year in the following ways:

  • Scrutiny of workbooks by senior leadership team and English and maths leaders – frequency will depend on the rate of progress each PP child is making.
  • Analysis and evaluation of termly assessment data by heads of year, English and maths leaders and senior leadership team
  • Pupil conferencing
  • Pupil progress meetings with action/who/when action plans written for individual or groups of children.
  • Pupil premium profiles for each PP child to track daily progress in lessons, reviewed weekly at staff meetings
  • Records of conversations with parents, children and teachers
  • Half termly meetings between Inclusion Leader and PP governor, to discuss progress data and impact of PP spending funded interventions, and progress against the PP action plan
  • Standing agenda item at meetings of the Governing Body’s Standards and Resources Committees

Monthly liaison between Attendance Leader and Inclusion Leader to discuss any attendance/punctuality concerns for PP children.

REVIEW STATEMENTS

During 2014-15 Kings Furlong Juniors used the Pupil Premium in the following ways:

Focus groups

There are English focus groups in all 4 year groups, a focus maths group in Y6 and they run every morning.  The composition of each group is decided within the year group and is based on the most effective ways to meet the needs of the children.  For example, the Y6 English group consists of the most able children, the Y4 group the least able and Y3 and Y5 a broader mix of ability.

Impact

The PP children in the Y3 focus group have almost made outstanding progress.  In Year 4, the PP children have made expected key stage progress based on sublevels.  Although their key stage progress is not yet ‘good’, the PP children in Y5 made outstanding progress this year, which will enable them to catch up by the end of the key stage.  In Y6, the children made outstanding year and key stage progress.

Coaching

Y6 PP children were coached in maths – a level 4 group of 8 children and a level 5 group of 7 children.  There was a SPAG (spelling, punctuation and grammar) group of 5 children for the writers who needed stretching to attain a level 4.  Each group was coached twice a week.

Children in years 3-5 who were most at risk with their writing progress were coached.  This was a combination of working in class and out of class as appropriate and was tailored to each child’s needs.  This involved working with the class teacher to develop best practice for that particular child as well as making resources, checklists etc to support learning and independence.

Impact

The level 4 maths group made outstanding progress and good key stage progress.  The level 5 maths group made outstanding year progress.  The level 4 SPAG group also achieved outstanding year progress and good key stage progress.

Of the children coached in Years 3-5, 75% made good or better in-year progress.  47% have made expected or better key stage progress.  Some of these children will receive further support to ensure their progress continues in order to further close the gap in their key stage progress.

Attendance

The school tracks all children who have attendance and punctuality issues, including those who are PP, and take action where necessary. We also deploy our Family Support Worker who is effective at helping families with attendance and punctuality issues.  This area is well tracked and monitored. There have been many successes of improving punctuality and attendance since September.  An attendance prize is awarded every week in Celebration Assembly to reinforce the importance of good attendance and punctuality.

Iris camera

The camera, Spike, is used for teachers to assess the quality of teaching and learning within their own lessons.  As part of the review time, teachers are required to monitor how PP children are progressing within the lesson.  Outcomes and appropriate actions are recorded in the PP profiles.  The impact of the actions is discussed during performance management meetings and at year team meetings.

Family Support Worker

Kathy Gare supports families who are experiencing behaviour issues and punctuality and attendance issues.  60% of the families she supports are PP. Kathy provides a vital link between school and the parents of our children who find it difficult to access their learning for a variety of reasons. She also hears PP readers on a frequent basis.   Some examples of Kathy’s work include:

  • Supporting a mother who has difficulty organising her 2 children in the mornings so that they arrive at school punctually and ready for learning.
  • Supporting our parents when outside agencies that are involved with the family.
  • Supporting several parents who have health issues which impact on the children’s wellbeing.

Pupil Premium Profiles (not funded from PP budget)

30 minutes of each weekly staff meeting is ring-fenced for teachers to reflect on the progress of their PP learners that week and to decide on appropriate actions to undertake in order to further their progress.  These are monitored by Miss Dunn.

What next?

We are taking a different approach to supporting PP children through the deployment of the Pupil Premium in 2015-16.  Coaching, year 6 focus groups, attendance monitoring and our Family Support Worker will continue.  However, greater emphasis will be placed on supporting class teachers through developing quality-first teaching within the classroom which will benefit PP children more effectively.  This will be done through learning walks, greater use of Spike, professional coaching and Head of Year support.  The impact of all of these actions will be monitored by Miss Dunn and overseen by Mr Applegate and the governors.

The Pupil Premium 2015-16

We received £91,600 Pupil Premium funding from the government.  We deployed the money is a variety of ways to improve wellbeing and outcomes for our children who are in receipt of the Premium. 
UsePurposeOutcome
Release time for staffConference children, scrutinise books, team meetings to valuate and improve practice and progress for PP children.Individual needs of each PP child assessed and actions set to tackle barriers and improve rates of learning.
SENCO timeLiaise with teachers of children who are PP/SEN to ensure needs are met effectively eg use of scaffolding.PP children with additional needs had their needs met through quality first teaching and bespoke support based on their individual needs as well as interventions on a 1-1 or small group basis.  Our SENCO regularly supported teachers in order to tackle the learning difficulties of our SEN/PP children.
LSA trainingPlay therapy

Effective scaffolding and questioning

 

PP children are appropriately scaffolded to support their learning with the aim of reducing reliance on adults.
Educational psychologist supportActions for more complex learning needs of PP pupils put in place.Support is in place including additional adult support and is regularly evaluated.
Play therapyParticularly vulnerable PP children given more intense support from a trained therapist.Children have greater engagement and resilience in school, improved liaison with parents.  Pleasing progress has been made in reading, writing and maths and the children are beginning to close the gaps with their peers.
ELSA, Draw and Talk, pre-anger management, social skills supportSupport for children who have difficulties with social and emotional situations.Nearly a third of our PP pupils received additional pastoral support to improve their ability to self-regulate their behaviour and increase wellbeing and achievement.
Small group teaching for 1 termIncreased amount of teaching of basic skills in English and maths for PP children who need to make rapid progress.The vast majority of children in these groups made good progress.
Financial subsidiesFunding for trips, visits, opportunities at school, clubs.PP children participated fully in the opportunities the school provided which required finance.
Year 6 focus groupTeaching of a smaller group to ensure PP children securely on track to meet targets throughout the year.The children made strong progress in these groups.
1-1 LSA supportSupport for 2 children who require a personal curriculum.The needs for both children were met to ensure that school was attended regularly.
Progress meetings between teachers, heads of year and senior leadership teamNeeds of PP children who are not securely on track are scrutinised.Additional actions were put in place to close gaps based on the needs of the individual children which were evaluated regularly and adapted as appropriate.
Monitoring of workLearning journey and maths books monitoredAppropriate scaffolding and effective feedback ensured the provision for our PP children is good.
Family Support workerHelp for families who are experiencing behaviour problems or have punctuality and attendance issues.18 families have been supported in different ways to ensure the wellbeing of children attending our school.

The Pupil Premium 2016-17

Kings Furlong Junior School – Pupil Premium Plan 2016-17

The key aims of our Pupil Premium Plan are to:

  • To further improve the overall quality of teaching and learning in order to accelerate progress for our Pupil Premium children
  • To ensure that additional support and guidance is given to our PP in order for them to make accelerated progress, including having access to activities in and after school.
  • To ensure that the Leadership of the School articulates a clear vision with expectations on the standard of provision and pupil outcomes for PP children.
  • To ensure that our PP parents are communicated with and involved with their child’s learning and progress.

Budget allocation: £82 280

Read the review of our PP Plan using the link here.

Objective – TEACHING AND LEARNING – CPD

To further improve the overall quality of teaching and learning in order to accelerate progress for our PP children.

 Action/ProvisionMilestones/

Outcomes

Cost
1PP champions to support quality of teaching through supporting/coaching of vulnerable PP children in class.

Monitoring: CA

Evidence: data, learning walks, book sampling, teacher discussions, observations and pupil profiles.

PP children have appropriate provision to ensure good achievement.£15000
2SENCO to work with PP/SEN pupils and their teachers to ensure the pupils’ needs are met and their progress gaps are closing.

Monitoring: SD.

Evidence: meeting notes, data, book scrutiny

Actions for SEN/PP children in place by December 16.£9000
Objective – INTERVENTION AND SUPPORT

To ensure that additional support and guidance is given to our PP children in order for them to make accelerated progress towards closing the gap with their non-PP peers.

 Action/ProvisionMilestones/

Outcomes

Cost
1Provide additional Educational Psychologist time to determine the more complex learning needs of PP pupils.

Monitoring: SD

Appropriate targets and support in place to support SEN/PP pupils.£4,000
2Provide play therapy sessions for vulnerable PP pupils.

Monitoring: CA

Targets met by end of provision.£3,000
3Provide ELSA and Draw and Talk sessions for vulnerable PP pupils.

Monitoring: SD/RA

Evidence: improved Boxall scores, greater engagement with learning.

Targets met by end of provision.£1,500
4Provide reading intervention and key skills.

Monitoring: SD

Evidence: CH’s records, Head of Year records

Children not at expected standard for reading rapidly acquire skills in order to catch up.£12000
5Provide additional LSA support in Years 3 and 5 to support behaviour and the catching up of skills.

Monitoring: SD

Evidence: teachers’ planning, LSA records,

Children settle quickly into year group, grow in resilience and close gaps in learning by Dec 16.£21000
6Provide release time for Sh D to support pupils in Y4 who have identified gaps in learning. Release time provided by student teacher.

Monitoring: SD

Evidence:

Children begin to close gaps in learning by Dec 16.£2000
7Provide a subsidy for PP children as needed towards trips, visits, uniform etc. (£80 per child)

Monitoring: SD

All PP children included in trips and visits.£5,200
8Provide 1/3 of cost of Y6 residential (13 children)All Y6 PP children participate in PGL.£1000
9Provide additional support to Year 6 PP pupils through focus groups in maths and English.

Monitoring: SD

Evidence: book scrutiny, data, profiles.

PP children securely on track to meet their targets at data collection points throughout year.£30000
AIndividualised support for 2 children who qualify as ‘post looked after children’.

 

Wellbeing and achievement of children is supported through a range of appropriate actions.£3,800
11Provide ‘Relax Kids’ sessions to help children learn techniques to manage emotions.Improved wellbeing and positivity£3,500
Objective – LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT

To ensure that the Leadership of the School articulates a clear vision with expectations on the standard of provision and pupil outcomes for PP children.

 Action/ProvisionMilestones/OutcomesCost
1Regularly discuss targets, gaps and needs of PP children in staff meetings, progress meetings, year group meetings.

Monitoring: SD and CA

Evidence: meeting notes, subsequent actions carried out.

All PP children are securely on track to meet their targets and appropriate interventions and support are in place to ensure this.No additional cost
2Monitoring to ensure expectation and progress is planned for and delivered.

Monitoring: CA

Evidence: books and planning

Actions and next steps acted upon and checked during next monitoring.£2000
3Co-ordinate and monitor activities and assess the impact in order to support the PP provision across the school.

Monitoring: CA

 

Actions are carried out and impact measured.£7000
Objective – PARENTAL ENGAGEMENT

To ensure that our PP parents are supported and involved with their child’s learning and progress.

 Action/ProvisionMilestones/OutcomesCost
1Employ Family Support Worker to support families with issues around punctuality, attendance, behaviour etc.

Monitoring: SD on a termly basis

PP children with family and/or attendance issues have improved wellbeing, attendance and progress.£3,500
2Pastoral/inclusion support for key families.  Key families are supported by one member of SLT who takes responsibility for overseeing work with outside agencies and maintaining good relationship and communication between school and family.

Monitoring: SLT

Children are supported in all ways possible.No additional cost
3Improve and monitor attendance and punctuality of PP pupils (e.g. attendance prizes, release time for attendance manager)

Monitoring: SD with CA on a half termly basis.

Evidence: attendance data

PP attendance closing gap with non PP attendance.£3,000
4Parents are informed about the extra support their child is receiving in school and the progress they are making.

Monitoring: SD/CA

Parents know how their child is progressing and the level of support they are receiving.No additional cost
5Termly parent workshops on developing basic skills so that they know how to support their children.

Monitoring: CA

PP parents attend workshops.£2,000

Include plans for Sept 2017 here.